Natural Skin Care Protection Against Pollution and Anti-Aging

The air we breathe and our environments are becoming increasingly polluted, placing greater pressure on our natural resources, such as our skin. Nature has provided us with the means of protecting them, with our skin. It is now generally accepted that a well-balanced natural plant-based diet provides a source of unlimited energy-boosting properties. They help promote a healthy functioning metabolic state, keeping our muscles and bones strong and helping prevent injury.

The natural way is recognized as being beneficial and protecting our bodies, as well as helping to remove free radicals from our skin and body that is the cause of premature aging. Therefore, it must follow that a natural skin care treatment will protect, nourish and moisturize our skin as well as healing skin tissue and helping, providing further advantages regarding anti-aging.

The health benefits of natural foods and ingredients have long been promoted, as a means of helping maintain a healthy and well-conditioned body. The spin-off is related to skin care and developing protection for our skin at the same time. For those who are conscious of the aging process and wish to remedy the situation, then the natural anti-aging option is available to you.

It is sometimes confusing for many of us when purchasing a health related product from a store and then being confronted with a list of content ingredients, with strange-sounding names. Without degrees in chemistry, we, therefore, usually have no idea what we are ingesting, or putting on our skin! The allure of, for example, an anti-aging product in descriptive impact packaging is a temptation, but generally like its product content, not real.

Natural ingredients are genuine and our bodies react to them accordingly. Chemicals are substitutes for the true value of natural products; so, why not work with Mother Nature and get natural!

Anti-aging cream and Great Expectations

There is an abundance of claims and advertising in magazines, newspapers and the Internet related to anti-aging products and skin care generally. There are images of bland looking jars side-by-side with hypodermic needles, with promises of a new and younger you. The general message they attempt to transmit is that the average cosmetic creams offer the same results regarding wrinkle and aging defying results as some extremely expensive wrinkle-filling injections.

This type of promotion and marketing related to anti-aging, in particular, has created a general skepticism in the targeted populations at large, as well as in certain members of the medical profession. One particular observation is that if these creams could produce the same results as medical procedures, they would be recognized as drugs, not cosmetics! These are some of the realities and influence that a consumer of skin care and anti-aging products must consider and be realistic in their great expectations.

Established and proven producers of natural, plant-based anti-aging products, for example, generally do not project their claims beyond their proven potential. They are explicitly simple in their marketing, statements regarding the stimulation of collagen regeneration and dermal cell repair. As a result, you can be reasonably confident that with daily application, your skin gains renewed strength and reliance.

Working with nature is as everyone is aware, the natural process in life, and although these products and methods are sometimes not as dramatic as Hollywood designer presentations, products, they are usually true value and genuine. For anyone conscious of their age and wishing to enhance their appearance, it is perhaps preferred that you do not try to reverse the natural process, but rather to maintain and reduce those fine lines, wrinkles and discoloration and gain a refreshed, vibrant and even skin texture, the natural way!

Collagen and the Anti-aging Benefits

A natural completely plant-based cream that stimulates collagen regeneration and dermal cell repair can result in your skin regaining its vibrancy and even texture. The question that is probably being asked by some readers, is what is collagen and how can it help me get a new look?

Collagen is an important factor in how the skin ages; it’s the support structure providing our skin with a firm, young appearance. While the levels of collagen are high, our skin retains its young and fresh appearance. Despite the use of various commercial skin care products, as the aging process begins collagen levels decline and as this crucial support factor is lost, wrinkles begin to form. While cosmetic skin care such as injections may provide a temporary solution, various studies have confirmed that application of a proven anti-aging product does stimulate a regeneration of collagen. This has the effect of filling the skin, but without the practice of using needles!

When related to an anti-aging cream collagen is a protein present in the connective tissues of the body. It is crucial to the strengthening of certain parts of the body; for example, nails and is also an important factor in healthy joints. As a skin care product, it has the effect of helping maintain the skin in a firm, tight, flexible, and youthful condition. It is natural that young people have the capacity of producing greater amounts of collagen than those of an older age.

As age progresses, the collagen in the body breaks down, this leads to wrinkles forming and slackness around the area of the mouth. Forming part of an anti-aging cream, collagen regeneration provides the benefit of a more youthful looking skin, which has which has been proven in many and varied circumstances, including plastic surgery.

The Programmed Cellular Death Approach to Anti-Aging Treatment

Modern anti-aging treatment is built on a common base of knowledge that I will quickly review. Biochemistry and molecular biology tell us there are many types of chemical reactions going on in the human body. We know that it is the genetic information programmed inside our cellular DNA that defines what reactions occur. Genetic information, expressed in regulated ways, builds the body’s proteins and enzymes, and controls how enzymes carry out the cell’s biochemical reactions.

This information, contained in the DNA of our genome, consists of many thousands of long, often repetitive, sequences of base pairs that are built up from four basic nucleotides. Human genome mapping has shown there are over 3 billion base pairs in our DNA. It is estimated they contain some 20,000 protein-coding genes. All body functions are controlled by the expression of the genes in our genome. The mechanisms controlling the aging process are believed to be programmed into our DNA but only a fraction of the biochemical reactions related to the aging process have been looked at in any detail. Cellular aging is a very complex process and many of its low level operating details have yet to be discovered.

Anti-aging theory has consolidated itself along two lines of thought: the programmed cellular death theory and the cellular damages theory. The programmed death theory focuses on the root causes of aging. The cellular damages theory looks at the visible aspects of aging; i.e. the symptoms of aging. Both theories are correct and often overlap. Both theories are developing rapidly as anti-aging research uncovers more details. As works in progress these theories may take years to complete. This broad characterization also applies to the currently available types of anti-aging treatments.

The programmed death theory of aging suggests that biological aging is a programmed process controlled by many life span regulatory mechanisms. They manifest themselves through gene expression. Gene expression also controls body processes such as our body maintenance (hormones, homeostatic signaling etc.) and repair mechanisms. With increasing age the efficiency of all such regulation declines. Programmed cellular death researchers want to understand which regulatory mechanisms are directly related to aging, and how to affect or improve them. Many ideas are being pursued but one key area of focus is on slowing or stopping telomere shortening. This is considered to be a major cause of aging.

With the exception of the germ cells that produce ova and spermatozoa, most dividing human cell types can only divide about 50 to 80 times (also called the Hayflick limit or biological death clock). This is a direct consequence of all cell types having fixed length telomere chains at the ends of their chromosomes. This is true for all animal (Eukaryotic) cells. Telomeres play a vital role in cell division. In very young adults telomere chains are about 8,000 base pairs long. Each time a cell divides its telomere chain loses about 50 to 100 base pairs. Eventually this shortening process distorts the telomere chain’s shape and it becomes dysfunctional. Cell division is then no longer possible.

Telomerase, the enzyme that builds the fixed length telomere chains, is normally only active in young undifferentiated embryonic cells. Through the process of differentiation these cells eventually form the specialized cells from which of all our organs and tissues are made of. After a cell is specialized telomerase activity stops. Normal adult human tissues have little or no detectable telomerase activity. Why? A limited length telomere chain maintains chromosomal integrity. This preserves the species more than the individual.

During the first months of development embryonic cells organize into about 100 distinct specialized cell lines. Each cell line (and the organs they make up) has a different Hayflick limit. Some cell lines are more vulnerable to the effects of aging than others. In the heart and parts of the brain cell loss is not replenished. With advancing age such tissues start to fail. In other tissues damaged cells die off and are replaced by new cells that have shorter telomere chains. Cell division itself only causes about 20 telomere base pairs to be lost. The rest of the telomere shortening is believed to be due to free radical damage.

This limit on cell division is the reason why efficient cell repair can’t go on indefinitely. When we are 20 to 35 years of age our cells can renew themselves almost perfectly. One study found that at the age 20 the average length of telomere chains in white blood cells is about 7,500 base pairs. In humans, skeletal muscle telomere chain lengths remain more or less constant from the early twenties to mid seventies. By the age of 80 the average telomere length decreases to about 6,000 base pairs. Different studies have different estimates of how telomere length varies with age but the consensus is that between the age of 20 and 80 the length of the telomere chain decreases by 1000 to 1500 base pairs. Afterwards, as telomere lengths shorten even more, signs of severe aging begin to appear.

There are genetic variations in human telomerase. Long lived Ashkenazi Jews are said to have a more active form of telomerase and longer than normal telomere chains. Many other genetic differences (ex.: efficiency of DNA repair, antioxidant enzymes, and rates of free radical production) affect how quickly one ages. Statistics suggest that having shorter telomeres increases your chance of dying. People whose telomeres are 10% shorter than average, and people whose telomeres are 10% longer than average die at different rates. Those with the shorter telomeres die at a rate that is 1.4 greater than those with the longer telomeres.

Many advances in telomerase based anti-aging treatments have been documented. I only have room to mention a few of them.

– Telomerase has been used successfully to lengthen the life of certain mice by up to 24%.

– In humans, gene therapy using telomerase has been used to treat myocardial infarction and several other conditions.

– Telomerase related, mTERT, treatment has successfully rejuvenated many different cell lines.

In one particularly important example researchers using synthetic telomerase that encoded to a telomere-extending protein, have extended the telomere chain lengths of cultured human skin and muscle cells by up to 1000 base pairs. This is a 10%+ extension of telomere chain length. The treated cells then showed signs of being much younger than the untreated cells. After the treatments these cells behaved normally, losing a part of their telomere chain after each division.

The implications of successfully applying such techniques in humans are staggering. If telomere length is a primary cause of normal aging, then, using the telomere length numbers previously mentioned, it might be possible to double the healthy time period during which telomere chain lengths are constant; i.e. from the range of 23 to 74 years to an extended range of 23 to 120 or more years. Of course this is too optimistic because it is known that in vitro cultured cells are able to divide a larger number of times than cells in the human body but it is reasonable to expect some improvement (not 50 years but say 25 years).

We know that telomerase based treatments are not the final answer to anti-aging but there is no doubt that they can, by increasing the Hayflick limit, extend or even immortalize the lifespan of many cell types. It remains to be seen if this can be done safely done in humans.

A Few Tips On Anti-Aging

As we start growing older, at each birthday celebration, we start realising the years that have gone by and how exercise and skin care is essential to keep ourselves healthy and glowing. The years have taken a toll on our body and the abuse starts revealing in your skin.

A look at yourself in the mirror will tell you that your skin is no longer radiant and youthful as it was during your teenage days. Lack of exercise, excessive exposure to sun and wind drains out the oiliness and slowly ages your skin prematurely. You can now change some of your unhealthy habits and look at some natural ways to get your skin healthy and glowing once again.

Eat Fruits and Vegetables: Fruits and vegetables are a high source of Vitamin C which will keep away wrinkles and age-related dryness of the skin. Some better-known foods rich in Vitamin C include watermelon, orange, apricots, pineapple, cauliflower, tomato, potato, lemon and much more.

Sunscreen Lotions: Harmful UVA and UVB rays tend to damage your skin. This not only darkens your complexion, but it also leads to skin aging, thus giving you unwanted fine lines and wrinkles. Sunscreen lotions act as a sunblock. Choose a sunblock with an SPF of over 15 which will block 96%. An SPF of 40 is highly recommended because it blocks 99%.

Beauty Sleep: Lack of sufficient sleep makes you weary and tired. Try to get a good comfortable sleep for at least 7 to 8 hours per day. If required change your bedding, draw the curtains to prevent outside light from entering your room and make your bedroom a cozy place.

Drink Water: Drink water at regular intervals. During any kind of physical activity or even during hot weather the body loses water through sweat. It is an inherent cooling mechanism for the body. This sweat loss needs to be compensated with sufficient fluid intake. Drinking water and fluids compensate the loss thus making your skin healthy and glowing. Water also feeds your cells to give the energy you need. Besides, it will also help flush viruses and infections out of the body.

Exercise: Exercises help tone your skin and muscles. There are several facial exercises that will prevent the skin from sagging or giving a worn-out look. It Improves blood circulation, restores skin elasticity, tones underlying muscles, help reduce wrinkles, lifts sagging skin and gives a healthy glow.

These are some of the few best anti-aging tips. Do all of the above and face the world with confidence. Perhaps you can also get some Lifestyle Products to further enhance your personality.